02
Apr

Review: Gustin Denim

A while back I blogged about Gustin Denim’s Kickstarter project and also mentioned it at Put This On, which came in with the promise to offer $81 raw selvedge denim jeans. 

The pitch hit all the right notes: denim fabric sourced in the United States or Japan, made in San Francisco and a price that reflects selling direct to customers versus retail markup. 

The Kickstarter was a massive success, but my one hangup on issuing a blanket recommendation about Gustin was that I’d not handled the product myself and I thought sizing could be a bit tricky along with exchanges. I also wondered what Gustin would do post-Kickstarter and how they would continue to offer their jeans to those who wanted them. 

Gustin launched their new website this week and they were kind enough to provide me with a pair to examine and photograph for this review.

After having hand’s on with Gustin’s jeans, I’m giving them a recommendation. 

One of the first things I noticed about Gustin’s jeans were the back pockets and their unique blue horizontal stitch. At first, I thought this was a decoration, but it turns out that it’s actually there to functionally attach an inner cloth liner to help prevent your back pockets from blowing out and forming holes. 

Of course, you can look up a bit higher and see the leather patch. I’m not person who places a lot of value on the leather patch on denim, but it does feel more substantial than one that would appear on a pair of Levi’s. However, it feels thinner than the Tanner Good patch that comes on a pair of 3Sixteens. As someone who wears a belt over the patch anyway, I’m not too hung up on it, but I did appreciate that the patch is darker and subdued rather than outlandish. 

The inside of the jeans is pretty standard. The left pocket has a patch sewn on with information about the jean’s fabric, fit, care instructions, etc., and the fly also features a selvedge edge. 

What really impressed me, however, were the buttons. I love the buttons on this pair more than any other jeans I’ve worn or seen. 

The tops of the buttons feel thick, unlike other pairs where the fly buttons are almost sharp along the edges. The result is a more knob-like feel that buttons smoother and rolls along your fingertips better. It’s hard to explain why I’m obsessed with these buttons, but Gustin sourced unique hardware. 

The seam rivets are also interesting. Rather than having tiny studs that stand up and protrude, their rivets are recessed and smoother as you brush over them. 

Gustin also uses some subtle stitching details with red thread, placing it along the inside hem, the crotch seam and at the outside opposite the selvedge. It’s a small detail that most won’t ever see, but it’s a nice way to distinguish their pairs from others without going over the top.

Of course, a large selling point of jeans comes down to fit.

I’m a natural 33” waist and typically take a 32” waist in most raw selvedge denim jeans I buy. Gustin didn’t have a 32” available to send me, but did provide me with a pair in size 33”. 

If you know your actual measured waist size, I’d recommend definitely sizing down 1” and perhaps consider going down 2” to account for stretching in the denim over time.

Regardless, I felt the jeans offered a good fit that was flattering and looked slightly better than a pair of Levi’s 501s would give you. The seat area of the jeans were comfortable and I felt that going down a size or two would still be pretty good and only slightly tighter. The rise was about where I’d like a pair of jeans to be — not too low, just slightly above a mid-rise. 

For those of you who don’t like a straight cut, Gustin is now offering a slim cut. I’d perhaps also consider going with a slim cut if you’d like a smaller leg opening. You can see their size chart here

In their post-Kickstarter phase, Gustin is now doing something similar on their own website. You can “back” a pair of jeans for pre-order and if enough buyers back a particular fabric, then the jeans begin production. Prices range from the original $81 to $99 — both of which I think are a very fair price for these jeans. 

The one thing I cannot comment on yet is how Gustin’s jeans will look over time after many wears and a wash, but that’s a risk you take with any new pair of jeans. What I can say is that I think Gustin is bringing a lot of value and thought into their jeans and if you’re on the fence, then consider trying a pair. 

21
Jan

GUSTIN Denim — I already wrote about this for Put This On, but wanted to repost this here in case some of you missed it. For those who haven’t heard yet, Gustin is holding a Kickstarter project to offer their jeans at wholesale prices direct to their supporters. If you pledge $81, then you should be receiving a pair of their jeans made from White Oak Cone Mills selvedge denim fabric and manufactured in San Francisco. 

I should say up front that I’m not a backer of the project. The fact is that I already have three pairs of selvedge denim jeans in rotation — Levi’s 501s, Edwin and 3Sixteen SL-100x — and I really don’t have use at the moment for another pair. I’m happy with all three pairs and wear them in different contexts. But the pair of 3Sixteens I bought were pretty darn expensive and it’s going to be a long time before I consider buying a pair at that price again — so that’s what caught my eyes about Gustin, who’s essentially offering what appears to be high-quality raw denim for a third of the price. 

If you’re looking for a review, then check out Wefty + Mash, who did a hands-on review of the jeans and has some more details on their construction. And as previously mentioned at PTO, Simpler Man and abitofcolor both have some thoughts, too. 

The Kickstarter still has about two weeks left and they’re constantly adding new fabrics that will be in limited runs, so it’s worth checking their Twitter and updates page for more information if that interests you. 

16
Aug

Investment Pieces: Levi’s 501 jeans

Remember the pilot of “Put This On” and how it was kind of mindblowing that some people spend a couple hundred dollars on jeans? At the time, I thought, “Wow, that’s fucking expensive. I’ll never do that.” Fast forward two-and-a-half years later and I’m buying a pair of 3Sixteens at Self Edge in San Franscisco’s Mission District. 

But let’s rewind a bit to just over two years ago when I decided to buy a pair of Levi’s 501s that happened to be selvedge and their “rigid” dark denim fabric. I did the whole thing of sizing down 2” in the waist, knowing it would stretch and began to break them in for a week. Then two weeks. Then almost three. 

I never got them hemmed, even though my tailor gave me some shit about rolling the cuffs (“You look like a little boy!” he said, after only a few weeks earlier telling me I should start shaving regularly because I looked like an old man). I washed them the first time in a bathtub with Woolite Dark and let them hang dry after about six months.

It’s been about the same amount of time between washes since. It’s not that I can’t stand the smell, but every once in a while I’ll be at the grocery store or in a bar in Logan Square and some hipster just reeks really bad of body odor — like those kids in junior high gym class whose parents hadn’t had the deodorant talk yet with them — and I get a bit self conscious and smell my jeans to see if they are approaching ironic levels of freshness. I just hate the idea of smelling offensive to people when I actually have access to water and soap. 

Still, the jeans are great. No crotch blowouts, no rips or serious damage. The fading has started to show up a bit, especially when I compare them to my newer jeans. But the real awesome thing is just how comfortable they are to wear. I love wearing them around the house, because they’re never not soft and worn. It’s like comfort food, that you wear on your legs. 

Best of all, they weren’t that expensive. You can easily find pairs for under $100.

The cut isn’t the slimmest, but it’s not bordering on absurd, either. If you really want to slim them up, pay $15-30 to a tailor to have them tapered to your liking (something I did with a pair in white denim). Plus, I really like them for the fact they have a button fly and the rise on them is a little bit higher — something nice to have in the sea of low-rise denim out there (how people keep their shirts tucked in, I’ll never know). 

But get a cheap pair of jeans and then you won’t be afraid to screw them up by wiping your dirty hands on them all the time — like when you’re prepping ingredients to make tacos or spilled some of your drink on your hands. They’re jeans, not rare silks. Wear them paintballing or while digging your car out from the largest blizzard in decades. 

I’m not going to be that denimhead who tells you “My jeans, they tell a story,” because that’s not true and my life isn’t that interesting. But I have noticed that there’s a worn diagonal crease line along the left thigh to the knee where the fabric always bends from when I cross my leg while sitting. And there’s a white stain from my pet cockatiel who shit on them because I haven’t figured out how to housetrain her in the past dozen years I’ve had her — not that I’m angry or anything about that.

You’ll probably wear jeans a lot — even if you wear a suit all day, you’ll probably just want to come home and change into jeans at the end of it — and I can say for certain that a pair of Levi’s 501s should last you a good while. I feel like I got a lot of mileage out of mine and I still keep grabbing them off the door hook in the morning. 

(“Investment Pieces" is a series about the items in my wardrobe that have gotten the most usage and wear. It’s part review and part paean to the clothes I really would recommend to anybody. These aren’t luxury items or limited in availability — you can get them anywhere at anytime for a fairly reasonable price.) 

14
Jul
suitsandboots:

Levi’s SALE ALERT: Take another 50% off SALE merch with promo code JULY50 today only. A great option if you’re in the market for a nice ($50) trucker jacket for the fall. This “trucker-work” jacket looks like another interesting option. They run small FYI.
There’s also a smattering of jeans available, most around $20 with promo. Also, selvage 501 dad jeans for $45.
Jeans
Shirts/Jackets
Accessories

For those of you folks on the ramen-noodle budget — or are like me and just like the button-fly and higher rise of the 501s.

suitsandboots:

Levi’s SALE ALERT: Take another 50% off SALE merch with promo code JULY50 today only. A great option if you’re in the market for a nice ($50) trucker jacket for the fall. This “trucker-work” jacket looks like another interesting option. They run small FYI.

There’s also a smattering of jeans available, most around $20 with promo. Also, selvage 501 dad jeans for $45.

For those of you folks on the ramen-noodle budget — or are like me and just like the button-fly and higher rise of the 501s.

07
Jul

L & M Vintage: Denim - A Riveting History

If you want to learn more about denim’s history, this is a worthwhile read from landmvintage:

My newest “vintage mission” is to find a pair of authentic old blue jeans. This is no easy task and requires a ton of education before setting out spelunking through thrift stores and estate sales. It is easy to be fooled by all the fake “vintage” denim on the market not to mention all the vintage-inspired lines that have been marketed by many denim companies in recent years. As part of my-self education, I have come across some interesting photos and facts about our historical love affair with denim - here are a few of my favorites:

(via landmvintage-deactivated2013041)

13
Jun
It’s on sale: Polo Ralph Lauren selvedge jeans
Mr. Porter’s sale continues with discounts up to 70% today, which basically takes things that are “really outrageously expensive” and marks them down to simply “expensive”. However, these slim-straight jeans with a button-fly seem rather reasonable — perhaps even cheap — at $43.50 ($56 with shipping). It’s recommended you size down (so if you’re a 34” waist, then go for a 32” sizing).

It’s on sale: Polo Ralph Lauren selvedge jeans

Mr. Porter’s sale continues with discounts up to 70% today, which basically takes things that are “really outrageously expensive” and marks them down to simply “expensive”. However, these slim-straight jeans with a button-fly seem rather reasonable — perhaps even cheap — at $43.50 ($56 with shipping). It’s recommended you size down (so if you’re a 34” waist, then go for a 32” sizing).

12
Jun

Factory from Edwin Europe on Vimeo.

mostexerent:

The myth & authenticity dispelled.. 

I never understand why people buy pre-distressed denim. It looks so fake — because it is fake! Part of the joy of wearing denim is breaking it in and having your body mold the material to your body. Seems like a huge waste of time, money and labor for a company to even bother to offer such a thing.

07
Feb
11
Aug
unconsumption:

Here’s a fun how-to post: make a wine bag from the legs of jeans. (For details, click on the pic above or link below.)
via Design*Sponge

For all of you who did the jean and khaki cutoff shorts this summer, here’s a classier way to carry your wine than the paper bag from the grocery store.

unconsumption:

Here’s a fun how-to post: make a wine bag from the legs of jeans. (For details, click on the pic above or link below.)

via Design*Sponge

For all of you who did the jean and khaki cutoff shorts this summer, here’s a classier way to carry your wine than the paper bag from the grocery store.

About The Silentist

A menswear blog on finding your personal style, written by Kiyoshi Martinez.

I work at Khaki's of Carmel and live in the Monterey Bay area. Formerly from Chicago.

E-mail me, I'm fairly nice: thesilentist@gmail.com

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