06
Jan
blazerbeams:

Got an envelope from Put This On today, and inside it was some MOTHER FUCKIN COLLAR STAYS.
Hell yeah.

Jealous. Mine haven’t arrived yet.

blazerbeams:

Got an envelope from Put This On today, and inside it was some MOTHER FUCKIN COLLAR STAYS.

Hell yeah.

Jealous. Mine haven’t arrived yet.

28
Sep
putthison:

Coming Soon
The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association
Wardrobes Refined by Mail on a Subscription Basis
Gentlemen Created and Maintained, Every 60 Days
Friend to Breast Pockets Worldwide

Hey, you know that Netflix/Qwikster subscription you’re angry about? Drop that and get on this instead.

putthison:

Coming Soon

The Put This On Gentlemen’s Association

Wardrobes Refined by Mail on a Subscription Basis

Gentlemen Created and Maintained, Every 60 Days

Friend to Breast Pockets Worldwide

Hey, you know that Netflix/Qwikster subscription you’re angry about? Drop that and get on this instead.

12
Sep

Sidebar: Entrepreneurs don’t ask for donations.

kingmeson:

My car and my house payments are made by me. My business expenses? By me. I’ve never taken a loan, or borrowed money from friends - and I sure as hell never asked for “donations”.

Good for you. But this PTO Kickstarter isn’t about you or your business. It’s about people who are passionate about a subject deciding to get together and create something that encapsulates those interests for people of various backgrounds to enjoy watching.

Donations are what nonprofits ask for, because they are public stewards charged with addressing public issues w/ the public’s money. Businesses are private enterprises charged w/ creating revenue - for its owners (unless we’re talking social entrepreneurship, but that’s another subject). 

Is PTO a business? Or is it a passion project that seeks to repay people involved with it for a portion of what their time and talent is worth? I don’t see PTO launching a webstore or a blog with the intention of turning it into some giant content farm that churns out editorial just to wrap advertisements around. Frankly, I see PTO as more or less a “barely for profit” educational institution, if anything (but that’s really underselling its value).

To see a group of people want to be taken seriously, ask me for a donation, because of some perceived value they have created for me in the past is asinine.

A lot of people who are taken seriously do ask others for donations because of their past history to bring perceived value they create: namely, every politician that’s had to run a campaign.

Or public-radio station.

Or religious institutions.

Why not a website that you enjoy reading and watching (for free!) that’s producing content to help people curious about a certain topic? Believe it or not, this is something real people on the Internet support — not just for the PTO Kickstarter, but all sorts of other similar projects around the web and in the real world. It’s hardly asinine to financially support the things you like — business or not.

Whatever a business has done for its customers it did so out of its own selfish desire to “shine” and distinguish itself from other businesses. As customers, we owe the businesses we patronize JACK SHIT, except payment for services rendered. My own clients do not view me as their friend. They view me as their tool. 

Again, I’d find it questionable that PTO is your typical business, if it even falls in that category. But that’s fine if you are running a business and found that successful for you. But just because someone asks you to pay them fairly for a service or product doesn’t preclude you from interacting with them as a human being. To me, I think relationships do matter.

If I decide I have a new business idea, I’ve got a few choices (1) raise the capital myself (2) look for investors (3) raise prices on my current products (4) look for partners (5) if my credit score permits, take out a loan. (6) be a ‘tard and ask my family and friends for cash. (and explain why my current business venture can’t pay for the next one) #ENDOFOPTIONS

Actually, PTO is doing the first four of those, but in a different way. It’s raising its own money to it doesn’t have to “sell out” to companies and brands that would like to use its reputation to covertly plant advertorial. And it’s looking for those investors online and around the globe. They raised their funding goals from the first season — significantly, I might add. And they’re asking everyone who likes what they do and wants to be a part of it to chip in if they want to see more.

Why should you limit yourself to the traditional ways of funding your passions? Kickstarter (and its clones) are helping more creative projects by creative people get done than ever before where this new, alternative type of funding wouldn’t normally be available.

The next time anyone on Tumblr, who has never ate a meal at your house and doesn’t know the name of your dog, asks for “donations” for a business idea, tell them to fuck theirselves - with broomsticks twice repeatedly.

Maybe there’s a reason why they never came over to your house for dinner.

Anxious to donate “These Nuts” to your upcoming project. Please post snail mail addy.

- King Me

There are a lot of ways to make a living and get money for doing the things you want, and not everyone will take the same path to get there. Just because someone is doing something differently than you, that doesn’t mean they’re doing something wrong.

I happen to believe people should get paid for their work. And I want to support people — when and where I can while financially able to do so — that produce things I find added something valuable to my life.

No, you don’t “owe” PTO anything. No one’s stealing your money or taxing you or holding a gun to your head to donate.

But we are saying that maybe, for a moment, people can be a little more giving and less selfish and cynical toward those who actually want to do something pretty cool. And if you’re feeling that way today, then donate.

12
Sep

putthison:

Now’s the time to put away the coulda-woulda-shouldas and bring out the here-I-goes. We’ve got three days left in our Kickstarter campaign to raise the funds to pay for a second season of Put This On. Already, more than 700 Put This On viewers have elected to help us make more. Hundreds of thousands of people watched season one. Tens of thousands subscribe to this blog and visit every day. If you want to see a second season of our show, you can make it happen.

If you haven’t donated yet, then shame on you! If you haven’t seen the series yet, then DOUBLE shame on you!

In all seriousness, please do contribute to help make the second season a reality. I thoroughly enjoyed the episodes and think the idea of traveling the world to see some great menswear “landmarks” and “persons of interest” would be the kind of editorial work that you won’t get to see anytime soon from other more “traditional” outlets.

29
Jul
putthison:

What are the Greatest Men’s Style Cities in the World?
As part of our preparations for season two of Put This On, we’re looking for the three greatest men’s style cities in the world. Our three choices will determine the content of our second season: this is serious business.
What are the greatest men’s style cities in the world? Hong Kong? Paris? Naples? London? Atlanta? Chicago? Dubai? Rome? Berlin? Harris & Lewis? San Francisco? New York? Mexico City? Shanghai? Kalamazoo?
What cities have the most amazing makers? The most remarkable shops? The most vital style cultures?
In the month of August, we’ll have a showdown to determine the winners, but before we get to that, we need nominees.
So, what do you think are the three greatest men’s style cities in the world? Either reblog this post with your answer, tweet your three picks with the tag #PTOCities, post them on StyleForum or email them to ptocities@gmail.com. Do it between now and Monday.
On Tuesday, we’ll tabulate the responses and set up our brackets.
Ready… steady… go!

I think there’s a good reason Chicago came in at fourth for GQ’s “Worst Dressed City” list. It’s not to say that we’re lacking the resources here to dress nicely as we have some great tailors, a fairly robust retail center, some haberdasheries, Made-in-America suiting from Hart Schaffner Marx and Oxxford and the Horween Leather Company.
We are not lacking in opportunity, however, we lack in execution and suffer from Midwestern malaise when approached with the thought of dressing nicely. I don’t think it’s symptomatic of just the Midwest or Chicago, as I get the impression it’s more of the modern American male’s attitude of indifference and complacency toward style and fashion.
Still, I will say that Chicago presents something unique in the fact that those who do dress well (or aspire to) are given the full range of seasons to develop portions of their wardrobe. So much of what’s done and worn here is straight out of utilitarian reasons, especially in the winter. The lakefront effect on the temperature and weather presents a challenge. It’s not surprising that everyone here wraps themselves in North Face gear.
I think Chicago also suffers a detrimental effect from the suburbs, where style of any form goes to die and is buried in formless pleated khakis, limp-collared polos, blousing dress shirts (worn with a visible white crew-neck T-shirt underneath and without a tie) and tennis shoe-meets-dress shoe hybrids. The rise of the suburban “campus” workplace with “business casual” dress codes took men’s style to a place around here that I’m sure Chicago will never recover from in the future.
But I love this “city of big shoulders” and its indifference at times. It’s a city that works and just wants to keep on working. It’s built a magnificent skyline that’s unrivaled in the Midwest and continues to draw and export talent. It’s a place that’s got bigger concerns than being the best dressed.

putthison:

What are the Greatest Men’s Style Cities in the World?

As part of our preparations for season two of Put This On, we’re looking for the three greatest men’s style cities in the world. Our three choices will determine the content of our second season: this is serious business.

What are the greatest men’s style cities in the world? Hong Kong? Paris? Naples? London? Atlanta? Chicago? Dubai? Rome? Berlin? Harris & Lewis? San Francisco? New York? Mexico City? Shanghai? Kalamazoo?

What cities have the most amazing makers? The most remarkable shops? The most vital style cultures?

In the month of August, we’ll have a showdown to determine the winners, but before we get to that, we need nominees.

So, what do you think are the three greatest men’s style cities in the world? Either reblog this post with your answer, tweet your three picks with the tag #PTOCities, post them on StyleForum or email them to ptocities@gmail.com. Do it between now and Monday.

On Tuesday, we’ll tabulate the responses and set up our brackets.

Ready… steady… go!

I think there’s a good reason Chicago came in at fourth for GQ’s “Worst Dressed City” list. It’s not to say that we’re lacking the resources here to dress nicely as we have some great tailors, a fairly robust retail center, some haberdasheries, Made-in-America suiting from Hart Schaffner Marx and Oxxford and the Horween Leather Company.

We are not lacking in opportunity, however, we lack in execution and suffer from Midwestern malaise when approached with the thought of dressing nicely. I don’t think it’s symptomatic of just the Midwest or Chicago, as I get the impression it’s more of the modern American male’s attitude of indifference and complacency toward style and fashion.

Still, I will say that Chicago presents something unique in the fact that those who do dress well (or aspire to) are given the full range of seasons to develop portions of their wardrobe. So much of what’s done and worn here is straight out of utilitarian reasons, especially in the winter. The lakefront effect on the temperature and weather presents a challenge. It’s not surprising that everyone here wraps themselves in North Face gear.

I think Chicago also suffers a detrimental effect from the suburbs, where style of any form goes to die and is buried in formless pleated khakis, limp-collared polos, blousing dress shirts (worn with a visible white crew-neck T-shirt underneath and without a tie) and tennis shoe-meets-dress shoe hybrids. The rise of the suburban “campus” workplace with “business casual” dress codes took men’s style to a place around here that I’m sure Chicago will never recover from in the future.

But I love this “city of big shoulders” and its indifference at times. It’s a city that works and just wants to keep on working. It’s built a magnificent skyline that’s unrivaled in the Midwest and continues to draw and export talent. It’s a place that’s got bigger concerns than being the best dressed.

25
Jul

putthison:

Put This On Episode 7: Personal Style

Episode seven of Put This On explores personal style - elegant, quirky, distinctive and everywhere in between.

Field correspondent Dave Hill visits the annual meeting of the Corduroy Appreciation Club, held each year on 11/11, the date which most resembles corduroy.

Then Roxana Altimirano brings a new Nerd Boyfriend segment, with an investigation of an icon of eccentric style, Andre Benjamin, aka Andre 3000 of Outkast.

Plus: a conversation with one of the world’s most elegant men, Gay Talese. He’s not just one of America’s most celebrated magazine writers and the man who invented the contemporary magazine profile. He’s also one of the best-dressed men in the world, the son of an immigrant tailor who imbued in his progeny a love of fine clothing. Besides that, he’s got his own lapel shape!

Stay tuned to putthison.com for more information about season two. If you or your business is interested in sponsoring season two, email us at contact@putthison.com.

Directed by Adam Lisagor

Editing & Second Camera by Benjamin Ahr Harrison

Hosted & Written by Jesse Thorn

Featuring Dave Hill & Roxana Altimirano

iTunes / Vimeo / YouTube

Clothing Credits

Funding Credits

Related Posts

I can’t honestly think of a better season closer interview than Gay Talese.

(Can someone please hit this up with a #menswear tag?)

08
Jul
putthison:

Did a real authentic Photo Shoot with our brilliant photographer pal Noe Montes. Here’s a tiny little taste.

"I put on for my city / On on for my city …"

putthison:

Did a real authentic Photo Shoot with our brilliant photographer pal Noe Montes. Here’s a tiny little taste.

"I put on for my city / On on for my city …"

23
Jun

Awesome that you're on the latest ep of Put This On, but now we know what your face looks like! :)

- Asked by bigdc

Not going to lie: it’s cool to even be remotely participating in that PTO episode. Thanks to Jesse for that! While it doesn’t bother me too much that people can see my face (which I’ve occasionally shown before here), it weirds me out to hear myself speak. Obviously, I won’t be a contestant on the next season of “The Voice”.

23
Jun

putthison:

Put This On Episode 6: Body

Jesse Thorn visits Carl Goldberg, owner of CEGO Custom Shirtmaker in New York City, to learn the difference between a custom shirt and an off-the-rack shirt. Then it’s off to Alan Flusser Custom in New York for a visit with the proprietor, a menswear legend. Flusser offers some tips on dressing for your body with the help of three associated of Put This On. Finally, a visit with Ryu Kwangeol at Pro Tailor in Los Angeles to answer a viewer’s question about altering off-the-rack dress shirts.

iTunes / Vimeo / YouTube

Clothing Credits

Funding Credits

Related Posts

Fantastic episode if you’re looking to learn more about fit, especially when it comes to shirts. And Flusser, you guys! FLUSSER!

23
May

putthison:

Put This On: A Conversation with Alan Flusser

In this special micro-episode of Put This On, we present a conversation with menswear expert Alan Flusser. Flusser has written the seminal American texts on getting dressed: Style & the Man and Dressing the Man. He’s also helped create a menswear iPhone app called BeSpeak. He runs Alan Flusser Custom in Manhattan, and famously dressed Michael Douglas for the film Wall Street. Alan’s not a designer or a tailor - he’s more like a consiglieri, guiding men towards their best appearance.

Alan’s expertise features heavily in our next episode of Put This On, but we thought we’d take this opportunity to introduce you to one of menswear’s great treasures.

His books are a really great, informative read and they’re quite approachable for anyone, no matter where they find themselves in their sartorial journey. While you can certainly read lots of menswear sites and blogs on the topic of style and dressing well, I think Flusser’s texts are well worth the purchase for the depth they bring the reader.

About The Silentist

A menswear blog on finding your personal style, written by Kiyoshi Martinez.

I work at Khaki's of Carmel and live in the Monterey Bay area. Formerly from Chicago.

E-mail me, I'm fairly nice: thesilentist@gmail.com

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