30
Apr
Review: UnderFit T-shirts

This will be my last review at The Silentist, and it feels a bit weird to have it be about an undershirt. But if you’re the kind of guy who wears undershirts everyday, then you’ve probably been searching for the one that fits better than the one you already own. 

I’ve not really talked at great length about undershirts (and only reviewed one other) just because it seems like a very personal preference, but as a guy who wears one I think you run into a lot of tradeoffs. If you buy cheap, then you get more — but they’re not as likely to fit as well. T-shirts are too short, or shrink oddly, or they don’t fit well along the torso. 

And then there are T-shirts like those from UnderFit: more expensive, but fit quite well and stay tucked. 

UnderFit shirts are simple. The collar is a deep V-neck that stays out of sight when you have your top button undone on a dress shirt. Their color is white. The shirt is designed to taper and hug your torso to avoid excess fabric along your waistline when you tuck it in.

The fabric is impressively soft after several washes. It’s a 57-38-5 modal, tencel and Lycra blend that’s designed to breathe better and resist bad odors, according to UnderFit. I tried wearing the shirt two days on the road while driving to test this. I didn’t think it smelled any worse on the end of the second day, but that’s just my anecdotal take. 

This is the second form-fitting T-shirt I’ve tried now and the concept is growing on me a lot more than I thought. Despite being a creature of habit, it didn’t take long before feeling the shirt felt “weird” to not noticing it at all. 

The only downside is the cost. At $24 per shirt, having a week’s worth in rotation will take a serious investment for some people. But like any item that fits well and performs better, you will have to decide if it’s a priority for you. 

Personally, I don’t think it would hurt to have a few. If you tend to wear your shirts tighter or simply want one for those days when you’ll be out longer and potentially in a more sweaty situation, then an UnderFit shirt could be a solution for you. 

I’m starting to view undershirts much like I do my socks: an item I initially balked at spending more on, but later saw the benefits of those which are made with more care in mind. If you’re on the fence, buy one and try it for yourself. If your experience is similar to mine, you’ll probably like it and open up to the idea of buying more as your older undershirts wear out.

Review: UnderFit T-shirts

This will be my last review at The Silentist, and it feels a bit weird to have it be about an undershirt. But if you’re the kind of guy who wears undershirts everyday, then you’ve probably been searching for the one that fits better than the one you already own.

I’ve not really talked at great length about undershirts (and only reviewed one other) just because it seems like a very personal preference, but as a guy who wears one I think you run into a lot of tradeoffs. If you buy cheap, then you get more — but they’re not as likely to fit as well. T-shirts are too short, or shrink oddly, or they don’t fit well along the torso.

And then there are T-shirts like those from UnderFit: more expensive, but fit quite well and stay tucked.

UnderFit shirts are simple. The collar is a deep V-neck that stays out of sight when you have your top button undone on a dress shirt. Their color is white. The shirt is designed to taper and hug your torso to avoid excess fabric along your waistline when you tuck it in.

The fabric is impressively soft after several washes. It’s a 57-38-5 modal, tencel and Lycra blend that’s designed to breathe better and resist bad odors, according to UnderFit. I tried wearing the shirt two days on the road while driving to test this. I didn’t think it smelled any worse on the end of the second day, but that’s just my anecdotal take.

This is the second form-fitting T-shirt I’ve tried now and the concept is growing on me a lot more than I thought. Despite being a creature of habit, it didn’t take long before feeling the shirt felt “weird” to not noticing it at all.

The only downside is the cost. At $24 per shirt, having a week’s worth in rotation will take a serious investment for some people. But like any item that fits well and performs better, you will have to decide if it’s a priority for you.

Personally, I don’t think it would hurt to have a few. If you tend to wear your shirts tighter or simply want one for those days when you’ll be out longer and potentially in a more sweaty situation, then an UnderFit shirt could be a solution for you.

I’m starting to view undershirts much like I do my socks: an item I initially balked at spending more on, but later saw the benefits of those which are made with more care in mind. If you’re on the fence, buy one and try it for yourself. If your experience is similar to mine, you’ll probably like it and open up to the idea of buying more as your older undershirts wear out.

01
Apr

Review: Mr. Davis Undershirts

image

If you’re the kind of guy who wears undershirts, then you’ve probably found your T-shirt of choice probably has some kind of problem that you don’t like — but you tolerate anyway. 

I like undershirts as they generally keep pit stains from showing up on my dress shirts, but the standard white V-neck does present a few problems for me from a lot of brands. 

First, a lot of undershirts are cut too short to tuck in and stay tucked in while under a dress shirt. If you have a longer torso like me, this is a constant frustration. And usually the few “tall” sized shirts you find aren’t often slim enough, typically starting in size “medium”. 

Of course, guys who wear white poplin dress shirts know that if you wear a white undershirt underneath, you often have the ghost of the undershirt visible, which looks bad. 

This is where Mr. Davis Undershirts come in and they offered me a free sample undershirt to try. I’m extremely resistant to change, especially when it comes to undershirts, but they definitely knock it out of the park in those first two categories I mentioned. 

For one, their shirts definitely are long enough to stay tucked in. The hem length is sufficient that bending over the shirt won’t ride up past your belt line. 

When it comes to staying invisible under your dress shirt, Mr. Davis shirts also excel at their goal. Here’s what my current white undershirts from Stafford look like under my white dress shirt:

image

And here’s the same dress shirt with a Mr. Davis Undershirts: 

image

You’ll note in the first photo you can see the end of the short sleeves of the T-shirt as well as the outline of the V-neck, whereas with the Mr. Davis shirts you can’t see any of this. This is because Mr. Davis uses a weird beige-tan color that blends closer to your natural skin tone. I was pretty impressed at how well this worked. 

It’s definitely also worth mentioning the fit of the undershirts. The fit is very form-fitting and tapers dramatically along the torso. I’m not a very muscular person, but it was essentially a second skin on me with a size medium (I’m a typical 38” chest in jackets). The fabric does have some stretch to it as it’s a bamboo-spandex mix (96-4), 

I’m a bit torn on whether the fabric is for me. For a long time I’ve liked cotton-synthetic blends because it had the softness of cotton but the anti-shrinking properties of the synthetics. Frankly, I’m just not used to wearing something this tight and this stretchy. It took some getting used to when first wearing it, but for those who like this and find it preferable, you’ll like Mr. Davis’ fabric choice. 

As far as details go, I liked how they went with a raglan sleeve rather than a set-in sleeve, which gives you greater movement in the arms. And the V-neck area is deep enough to allow for you to leave your top button undone and not worry about the undershirt showing. 

If you want to give Mr. Davis a try, then visit their Kickstarter page (as of this writing there’s only 9 days to go), where they’ve already met their initial funding goal and are offering shirts for as low as $15 a shirt when you buy 10 of them. Or you can go more modest and try a single shirt for $25. 

Overall, i like the shirt and think Mr. Davis is worth trying if you prefer your undershirts hidden, form fitting and with some stretch. 

About The Silentist

A menswear blog on finding your personal style, written by Kiyoshi Martinez.

I work at Khaki's of Carmel and live in the Monterey Bay area. Formerly from Chicago.

E-mail me, I'm fairly nice: thesilentist@gmail.com

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