17
Jan
The folks behind Hucklebury (see my Hucklebury shirts review) interviewed me for their Curators and Creators series at their Art of Style blog.
I had a good time chatting with them about a variety style-related topics — including influences, inspirations and tips for beginners looking to get started on improving their own style. Plus, I hint at a few future projects of where I’d like to take the blog next. 
Read the whole interview here.

The folks behind Hucklebury (see my Hucklebury shirts review) interviewed me for their Curators and Creators series at their Art of Style blog.

I had a good time chatting with them about a variety style-related topics — including influences, inspirations and tips for beginners looking to get started on improving their own style. Plus, I hint at a few future projects of where I’d like to take the blog next. 

Read the whole interview here.

27
Dec
Attn. San Francisco: Hucklebury Pop-up Sale — If you read my review of Hucklebury shirts and want to check them out for yourself, then stop by their pop-up shop. It’s going on now through New Year’s Eve. 

Attn. San Francisco: Hucklebury Pop-up Sale — If you read my review of Hucklebury shirts and want to check them out for yourself, then stop by their pop-up shop. It’s going on now through New Year’s Eve. 

21
Nov

Review: Hucklebury shirts (and giveaway)

While there’s been a plethora of made-to-measure shirting companies, I’ve noticed now that there’s a growing number of ready-to-wear shirting companies also popping up looking to find a balance between a better fit for customers who aren’t necessarily looking for the overwhelming options and choices that come with MTM online (or the hassle of measuring oneself or well-fitting shirt). 

One of these is Hucklebury, founded by Parag and Dhawal, that seeks to find a balance on these several factors. 

In terms of fabric, Hucklebury sources their fabrics from the Italian mills Thomas Mason and Tessitura Monti. The shirt sent to me for review I found is a 2-ply cotton poplin, which is a bit nicer for warmer weather as its a bit lighter. After a wash, the fabric held its dimensions well and I didn’t notice any shrinkage, which is nice.

For construction and design, Parag told me that they went through at least 25 to 30 variations on the pattern before finally settling on the two fits available (slim and regular) and that the shirts are made alongside shirts manufactured for brands like Zegna and Armani.

An interesting design choice includes adding a reinforced stitching on the bottom horizontal buttonhole with thicker thread to combat against the stress of pulling at the waistline and prevent stretching. 

On the collar, Hucklebury opted to have their collars sewn by hand, from the outside in, to help it stand up higher and not fall under the lapels of a jacket. The collar itself isn’t super skinny and puny, either. It’s of average size and the button-down collar works nicely sans necktie.

The backs of the shirt are darted, which I know can be kind of controversial among guys. My tailor refuses to do darts on shirts, however, I own several darted shirts and they do help add a slimmer profile that many trimmer and athletic gentlemen will appreciate. 

But it all comes down to fit — and I’m pleased with it. The chest, shoulders and waistline fit really well. Not too constrictive, nor too baggy for my tastes. 

Hucklebury sizes by neck, however, they don’t size by sleeve length. I tend to have longer arms (typically, I am a 15/35) so the shirt fell a bit short on my arms. If you’ve got shorter arms though, then it should be OK. 

The back darting does help taper the torso dramatically so you avoid the “puff” at the waistline when you tuck in your shirt. I feel this is among one of the more important points of fit from a visual standpoint — provided you’re wearing a properly sized collar and sleeve, too. 

Overall, I can appreciate what Hucklebury attempts to do for ready-to-wear shirts by going with higher-end fabric mills and bringing attention to a few key details. Their prices aren’t out of line — ranging from $85-$95 — considering the fabrics used and worth consideration.

Giveaway contest: Hucklebury is holding a contest, which you can enter below. 

Enter to win one Thomas Light Blue Stripes dress shirt (worth $95) size 15.

Winners will be announced on November 26.

The more entries you make, the greater your points, the greater your chance to win:

  • Answer a simple question: 5 points
  • Like Hucklebury on Facebook: 4 points
  • Tweet about the giveaway: 2 points (You can tweet once per day)

For U.S. residents only.

Click here to enter the giveaway!

About The Silentist

A menswear blog on finding your personal style, written by Kiyoshi Martinez.

I work at Khaki's of Carmel and live in the Monterey Bay area. Formerly from Chicago.

E-mail me, I'm fairly nice: thesilentist@gmail.com

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